utsepressblog

Open Access Publisher blog at the University of Technology Sydney

Should academics write for each other or for the public?

Johann. N. Neem’s article Coming Down From the Clouds, published in The Chronicle of Higher Education,  brilliantly explores both sides to the question: Should academics write for each other or for the public?

We increasingly live in an age of hard-fought-for and, at times, diminishing transparency: in government;  in media; and now, at times, in scholarly communication. When the tax-paying public becomes aware that their taxes are paying for the vast majority of research conducted within this country (and most others) many would like the opportunity to share in that knowledge creation and dissemination of which they are an integral part. To know, for example, that two black holes are colliding and that the impact of that collision can now be measured and conveyed to us in layers of profound meaning is, indeed, human progress. Neem writes:

We want physicists who write for each other. I appreciate that, at conferences and in academic papers, they have challenged each other’s conclusions and, in doing so, have pushed forward the boundaries of knowledge. Yet I am also grateful for my scientist friends who posted on Facebook links to videos and essays in which scientists explained, in terms that I could understand, why it was so significant that we had heard black holes colliding.

Has the time come for researchers to embrace lay summary dissemination services such as GrowKudos.com? Then, even if the scholarly work is impenetrable, at least the common Google researcher could find a trace of it and perhaps links to other works that may help explain it.

To explore more of Neem’s insightful piece please go here Coming Down From the Clouds: On Academic Writing

DOAJ listing and DOAJ Seal for UTS ePRESS Journals

We are proud to announce that currently all of our journals are listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). Further, three of our journals have been awarded the DOAJ Seal out of only 213 journals globallyPORTAL: Journal of Multidisciplinary International StudiesCosmopolitan Civil Societies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, and Organisational Project Management.

In order to be awarded the DOAJ Seal, journals must satisfy the seven following conditions:

The DOAJ Seal is a mark of certification for open access journals, awarded by DOAJ to journals that achieve a high level of openness, adhere to Best Practice and high publishing standards. To receive the Seal, the journal must comply with the following 7 conditions:

  • use DOIs as permanent identifiers;

  • provides DOAJ with article metadata;

  • deposits content with a long term digital preservation or archiving program;

  • embeds machine-readable CC licensing information in articles;

  • allows generous reuse and mixing of content, in accordance with a CC BY, CC BY-SA or CC BY-NC license;

  • has a deposit policy registered wíth a deposit policy registry;

  • allows the author to hold the copyright without restrictions.

New open access book ‘Georges Baudoux’s Jean M’Barai The Trepang Fisherman’ is now available

UTS ePRESS is excited to announce the release of the fascinating new open access book ‘Georges Baudoux’s Jean M’Barai The Trepang Fisherman’ with translation by Karin Speedy.

The free PDF version is available to download now at http://epress.lib.uts.edu.au/…/georges-baudouxs-jean-mbarai…. The dates for the official launch and print on demand to be announced in the near future.

George Baudoux's Jeam M'Barai cover (1)

UTS ePRESS announces partnership with Kudos

UTS ePRESS is excited and proud to announce its new partnership with award winning scholarly communication developer Kudos. Please see the Kudos video below for more information on their service:

 

With Kudos UTS ePRESS authors will be able to explain, enrich, share and measure the impact of their sharing with the Kudos dashboard for every one of their publications.

As Dr Belinda Tiffen, Director of Library resources at UTS, writes:

“As a growing open access publisher, a priority for UTS ePRESS is to extend the reach, impact and accessibility of the content we publish. Kudos shares our values of promoting high quality and ethical publishing and helps us broaden the support we can provide to UTS ePRESS authors, as well as giving us insight into the effectiveness of communications that UTS researchers undertake around works they publish elsewhere.”

For more information go to the UTS ePRESS site and go to “Contact”.

Reinventing UTS ePRESS

This set of CC BY slides shows the “Reinventing UTS ePRESS” presentation given by University of Technology Sydney (Library’s) Dr Belinda Tiffen and Scott Abbott at the Library Publishing Forum held in Portland, Oregon in March, 2015.

For accompanying speaker notes please contact UTS ePRESS at: utsepress@uts.edu.au

Two journal editors’ view of publishing with UTS ePRESS

Two journal editors’ view of publishing with UTS ePRESS

Our experience of publishing Cultural Studies Review with UTS ePress since 2010 has been been overwhelmingly positive, academically supportive and intellectually coherent. We edit a discipline-leading, internationally-oriented journal that was ranked as an A journal in an earlier ERA exercise. Between the two of us we have published with scores of publishers across the English-speaking landscape. In our view, UTS ePress is the most innovative Australian-based university publisher in the business. This is primarily because UTS ePress is both maintaining the best traditions of university presses and creatively exploring the many and varied options emerging in the world of electronic publishing and distribution. UTS ePress was an early proponent of the principles of Open Access that are now being embraced so broadly across the academic world. It’s no surprise that already in 2015 we have been approached (and not for the first time) by two commercial publishers, including one of the top transnational publishers, who are keen to offer us inducements to leave UTS ePress. We were more than happy to disappoint them and trumpet the virtues of UTS ePress.

Chris Healy

Associate Professor

The University of Melbourne

&

Katrina Schlunke

Associate Professor

University of Technology Sydney

%d bloggers like this: