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Open Access Publisher blog at the University of Technology Sydney

Special Issue on Ethnocracy

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Dear Reader,

In order to highlight the excellent content provided by UTS ePRESS Journals and Books we would like to take this chance to draw your attention to the (Open Access) Special Issue on Ethnocracy recently published by Cosmopolitan Civil Societies: an Interdisciplinary Journal. Below is the abstract of the Editorial Welcome to that Special Issue by James Goodman and James Anderson. Below the abstract is the DOI link which will take you to the full Editorial Welcome in PDF or HTML.

In addition, we would also like to draw your attention to an article in The Conversation that references articles in the Special Issue which provide more context and discussion on this important topic.

Enjoy your reading!

Editorial Welcome: Special Issue on Ethnocracy

James Anderson

ABSTRACT

This Special Issue of Cosmopolitan Civil Societies Journal focuses on the domination of social and political relations by Ethnocracy – rule or would-be rule by an ethnic group or ethnos, as distinct from Democracy or rule by the demos of all the people. Ethnocracy encompasses state regimes and associated political movements and parties that discriminate systematically in favour of a particular ethnic group (or groups) and against others. When we proposed the Special Issue in late 2014 ethnocratic practices were as prevalent as they had ever been; and now two years later they appear to be on the increase with an ethno-populist upsurge and the election or threatened election of governments pursuing ethnocratic agendas. From India to the USA, from Russia to Hungary, leading politicians openly discriminate against ethnic ‘others’ to attract support from ‘their own’ ethnic groups; across the European Union and in other liberal democracies they increasingly scapegoat ‘immigrants’ to hide their own inadequacies and further their political objectives. Now, more than ever, it is critical that the dynamics of ethnocracy are more clearly understood. This Issue documents the logics of ethnocracy in a variety of different contexts, posing questions about how it develops and how it can be challenged.
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For the full text of this article go to DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5130/ccs.v8i3.5283
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Two journal editors’ view of publishing with UTS ePRESS

Two journal editors’ view of publishing with UTS ePRESS

Our experience of publishing Cultural Studies Review with UTS ePress since 2010 has been been overwhelmingly positive, academically supportive and intellectually coherent. We edit a discipline-leading, internationally-oriented journal that was ranked as an A journal in an earlier ERA exercise. Between the two of us we have published with scores of publishers across the English-speaking landscape. In our view, UTS ePress is the most innovative Australian-based university publisher in the business. This is primarily because UTS ePress is both maintaining the best traditions of university presses and creatively exploring the many and varied options emerging in the world of electronic publishing and distribution. UTS ePress was an early proponent of the principles of Open Access that are now being embraced so broadly across the academic world. It’s no surprise that already in 2015 we have been approached (and not for the first time) by two commercial publishers, including one of the top transnational publishers, who are keen to offer us inducements to leave UTS ePress. We were more than happy to disappoint them and trumpet the virtues of UTS ePress.

Chris Healy

Associate Professor

The University of Melbourne

&

Katrina Schlunke

Associate Professor

University of Technology Sydney

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