Special Issue on Ethnocracy

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Dear Reader,

In order to highlight the excellent content provided by UTS ePRESS Journals and Books we would like to take this chance to draw your attention to the (Open Access) Special Issue on Ethnocracy recently published by Cosmopolitan Civil Societies: an Interdisciplinary Journal. Below is the abstract of the Editorial Welcome to that Special Issue by James Goodman and James Anderson. Below the abstract is the DOI link which will take you to the full Editorial Welcome in PDF or HTML.

In addition, we would also like to draw your attention to an article in The Conversation that references articles in the Special Issue which provide more context and discussion on this important topic.

Enjoy your reading!

Editorial Welcome: Special Issue on Ethnocracy

James Anderson

ABSTRACT

This Special Issue of Cosmopolitan Civil Societies Journal focuses on the domination of social and political relations by Ethnocracy – rule or would-be rule by an ethnic group or ethnos, as distinct from Democracy or rule by the demos of all the people. Ethnocracy encompasses state regimes and associated political movements and parties that discriminate systematically in favour of a particular ethnic group (or groups) and against others. When we proposed the Special Issue in late 2014 ethnocratic practices were as prevalent as they had ever been; and now two years later they appear to be on the increase with an ethno-populist upsurge and the election or threatened election of governments pursuing ethnocratic agendas. From India to the USA, from Russia to Hungary, leading politicians openly discriminate against ethnic ‘others’ to attract support from ‘their own’ ethnic groups; across the European Union and in other liberal democracies they increasingly scapegoat ‘immigrants’ to hide their own inadequacies and further their political objectives. Now, more than ever, it is critical that the dynamics of ethnocracy are more clearly understood. This Issue documents the logics of ethnocracy in a variety of different contexts, posing questions about how it develops and how it can be challenged.
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For the full text of this article go to DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5130/ccs.v8i3.5283
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Should academics write for each other or for the public?

Johann. N. Neem’s article Coming Down From the Clouds, published in The Chronicle of Higher Education,  brilliantly explores both sides to the question: Should academics write for each other or for the public?

We increasingly live in an age of hard-fought-for and, at times, diminishing transparency: in government;  in media; and now, at times, in scholarly communication. When the tax-paying public becomes aware that their taxes are paying for the vast majority of research conducted within this country (and most others) many would like the opportunity to share in that knowledge creation and dissemination of which they are an integral part. To know, for example, that two black holes are colliding and that the impact of that collision can now be measured and conveyed to us in layers of profound meaning is, indeed, human progress. Neem writes:

We want physicists who write for each other. I appreciate that, at conferences and in academic papers, they have challenged each other’s conclusions and, in doing so, have pushed forward the boundaries of knowledge. Yet I am also grateful for my scientist friends who posted on Facebook links to videos and essays in which scientists explained, in terms that I could understand, why it was so significant that we had heard black holes colliding.

Has the time come for researchers to embrace lay summary dissemination services such as GrowKudos.com? Then, even if the scholarly work is impenetrable, at least the common Google researcher could find a trace of it and perhaps links to other works that may help explain it.

To explore more of Neem’s insightful piece please go here Coming Down From the Clouds: On Academic Writing

Reinventing UTS ePRESS

This set of CC BY slides shows the “Reinventing UTS ePRESS” presentation given by University of Technology Sydney (Library’s) Dr Belinda Tiffen and Scott Abbott at the Library Publishing Forum held in Portland, Oregon in March, 2015.

For accompanying speaker notes please contact UTS ePRESS at: utsepress@uts.edu.au