Anatomy Quizbook – Web Version – is now available

MEDIA RELEASE

Date 01/11/2017
UTS ePress relaunches leading title with tekReader interactive platform

UTS ePRESS, a leader in open access scholarly publishing, has chosen tekReader, an Australian publishing innovation, as the web based eReader platform for republishing its successful Anatomy Quizbook.

The Anatomy Quizbook is an interactive learning text that helps students, tutors, and anyone interested in anatomy learn, test, and improve their knowledge of the human body. Readers are presented with carefully selected questions and diagrams addressing core learning in clinically-relevant anatomy. This selective rather than exhaustive approach will especially suit time-poor scholars. Regular self-testing will also ensure a robust and strategic understanding of the subject matter.
Originally published in PDF, UTS ePRESS have now relaunched the Anatomy QuizBook in tekReader an interactive publication format that combines the power of the web with the user experience of a contained publication that intuitively reflows to optimise reading on any device. You can now access the Anatomy Quizbook for free on tekReader @ https://utsepress.tekreader.com

 
Belinda Tiffen, Director of UTS ePRESS, said;
“The Anatomy Quizbook has been one of our most successful published texts to date. We wanted to make the Quizbook an engaging learning experience through interactive design elements, which we could not fully achieve in PDF. By republishing it in tekReader we can now offer our readers a web based publication with an immersive, interactive, reading experience that intuitively reflows for an optimal reading experience on any device, mobile or PC. This any-device capability is an important aspect of our mission as an open access publisher to make UTS ePRESS scholarly publications widely accessible. tekReader’s browser based eReader also means we’ll be able to use analytics to track audience behaviours which will better inform future product development”.

Don Stolee founder and CEO of eGloo Technologies and tekReader’s creator said;
“We’re delighted to be partnering with such a leading University and open access publisher. tekReader’s innovation is a perfect fit for UTS and the ePRESS as part of its aim to advance scholarly communication through new modes of technology. tekReader is not just an eReader or publishing system but, being API first, content and multimedia published through tekReader can be easily integrated and merged across different platforms including the University’s learning management system.”

About UTS ePRESS
UTS ePRESS is the digital, open access scholarly publishing arm of the University of Technology Sydney (UTS). Focusing on open access digital formats, UTS ePRESS publishes scholarly journals, books and conference proceedings and is the leading scholarly publisher of peer reviewed open access journals in Australasia. UTS ePRESS also publishes many high quality scholarly texts across a wide range of academic disciplines, with particular strengths in the humanities, arts and social sciences. http://epress.lib.uts.edu.au/

About tekReader
tekReader is an HTML5 eReader that renders and displays data-rich documents. Users can access, view and interact with documents using modern web browsers found on desktop computers and mobile devices. Responsive and adaptive web design provides an optimal user experience as the UI, content and functionality responds and adapts to any screen size. A true interactive document format, tekReader can be installed independently or combined with tekAuthor and tekPublish to create an end-to-end publishing solution. www.tekReader.com

For further information contact
utsepress@uts.edu.au

tekReader Anatomy Quiz

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Should academics write for each other or for the public?

Johann. N. Neem’s article Coming Down From the Clouds, published in The Chronicle of Higher Education,  brilliantly explores both sides to the question: Should academics write for each other or for the public?

We increasingly live in an age of hard-fought-for and, at times, diminishing transparency: in government;  in media; and now, at times, in scholarly communication. When the tax-paying public becomes aware that their taxes are paying for the vast majority of research conducted within this country (and most others) many would like the opportunity to share in that knowledge creation and dissemination of which they are an integral part. To know, for example, that two black holes are colliding and that the impact of that collision can now be measured and conveyed to us in layers of profound meaning is, indeed, human progress. Neem writes:

We want physicists who write for each other. I appreciate that, at conferences and in academic papers, they have challenged each other’s conclusions and, in doing so, have pushed forward the boundaries of knowledge. Yet I am also grateful for my scientist friends who posted on Facebook links to videos and essays in which scientists explained, in terms that I could understand, why it was so significant that we had heard black holes colliding.

Has the time come for researchers to embrace lay summary dissemination services such as GrowKudos.com? Then, even if the scholarly work is impenetrable, at least the common Google researcher could find a trace of it and perhaps links to other works that may help explain it.

To explore more of Neem’s insightful piece please go here Coming Down From the Clouds: On Academic Writing

Reinventing UTS ePRESS

This set of CC BY slides shows the “Reinventing UTS ePRESS” presentation given by University of Technology Sydney (Library’s) Dr Belinda Tiffen and Scott Abbott at the Library Publishing Forum held in Portland, Oregon in March, 2015.

For accompanying speaker notes please contact UTS ePRESS at: utsepress@uts.edu.au